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Hauptsachtitel:
Environmental education policy support in Southern Africa: a case story of SADC REEP.
Erscheinungsort:
Grahamstown
Erscheinungsjahr:
Hochschulschriftenvermerk:
Grahamstown, Univ., M.Ed. (Environmental Education), 2005
ISBN:
-
Kurzinfo:
Abstract: The study takes place in the context of the Southern African Development Community′s Regional Environmental Education Programme (SADC REEP). The SADC REEP is a programme of the Food Agriculture and Natural Resources Directorate of the SADC Secretariat. The programme is implemented through four components namely policy, networking, training and learning support materials development. The bulk of the policy budget is in the form of seed funding to support policy initiatives in the member states. The intention of this study is to illuminate factors that influence the deployment and use of seed funding to support environmental education policy processes within the SADC REEP. To sharpen the understanding of the context within which these activities take place, the study looks at the global and regional landscape of policy events and their influence on policy in the sub-region. The study also looks at the landscape of the fields within which environmental education is embedded, the power relations, and the notion of agency in environmental education policy processes. The discourse in environmental education policy processes is analyzed by drawing on Bourdieu′s constructivist structuralism to highlight some of the social and institutional complexities in dynamic fields, capital and policy context. The research takes a qualitative interpretative approach using case study methodology to explore the processes and influences that have a bearing on the SADC REEP policy sub-component, specifically the deployment and use of seed funding for policy initiatives. The findings show the complexity of the variables at play in shaping the processes of developing and reviewing environmental education policies in the sub-region. These variables include discourse that is used, economics and politics of the responsible institutions and actors, as well as relationships between the environmental field and education field. The results point towards a need to clearly understand the policy context within which the SADC REEP is operating in order to make correct assumptions, to develop realist expectations, and to put in place appropriate mechanisms that will effect the expectations. The study recommends further probing of the relationship between the actors and networks in relation to the success of policy processes. It also recommends a further exploration of the SADC REEP′s open-ended approach with respect to articulating the monitoring and consolidation of the successes in supporting environmental education policy processes.
Inhaltsverzeichnis :
Abstract
Acknowledgements
Table of contents
LIST OF FIGURES
LIST OF TABLES
LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

CHAPTER 1
THE PROFILE OF THE STUDY
1.1 INTRODUCTION
1.2 AIM OF RESEARCH
1.2.1 Rationale of the study
1.2.2 Aim of the study
1.2.3 My role in the study
1.3 CONTEXTUAL PROFILE OF STUDY
1.3.1 An introduction to the southern African sub-region
1.3.1.1 A brief profile of some of the member states
1.3.2 A contextual history of SADC REEP
1.3.3 A brief SADC REEP Policy Context
1.4 THE RELEVANCE OF THE STUDY
1.5 A CONCLUDING COMMENT

CHAPTER 2
PERSPECTIVES ON ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION POLICY CONTEXT AND PROCESSES
2.1 INTRODUCTION
2.2 EDUCATION AND ENVIRONMENT FIELDS
2.2.1 The education field as an old, well-established sector
2.2.2 The environment field as a new social movement
2.2.3 Environmental Education and Sustainable Development Discourse
2.3 ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND SUBSEQUENT POLICY PRAXIS
2.3.1 Implementation of Environmental Education Processes and Policies
2.3.2 Resourcing of Environmental Education Processes and Policies
2.4 REVISITING ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION POLICY IN THE FACE OF GLOBAL POLICIES
2.5 DIVERSITY IN APPROACHES TO POLICY MAKING
2.5.1 Social context of policy processes
2.5.2 Initiation of policy processes
2.5.2.1 Top-down approach
2.5.2.2 Bottom-up approach
2.5.2.3 Sectoral approach
2.6 CAPACITY BUILDING FOR POLICY DEVELOPMENT AND USE
2.6.1 Building capacity for decision making and practice in the face of uncertainty
2.6.2 Investing in organizations versus investing in people
2.6.3 Challenging power structures
2.6.4 Institutional change, uncertainty, environmental policy and social learning
2.6.5 Financial capacity building for environmental policy
2.7 CONTEXTUALIZING POLICY DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES WITHIN THE SADC REEP
2.7.1 Broader Environmental Policy Processes in Southern Africa
2.7.2 The SADC REEP objective revisited
2.7.3 Implications for the Research Question
2.8 A CONCLUDING COMMENT

CHAPTER 3
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
3.1 INTRODUCTION
3.2 THE RESEARCH ORIENTATION
3.3 THE RESEARCH METHOD
3.4 DESCRIPTION OF THE RESEARCH TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES
3.4.1 Data Generation
3.4.1.1 Layer 1: Broad document content analysis
3.4.1.2 Reflection on broad document content analysis
3.4.1.3 Layer 2: Questionnaires, conversations and member-checking
3.4.1.4 Reflections on Questionnaires
3.4.1.5 Deepening the Vignettes
3.4.1.6 Personal Communication and Reflection
3.5 ANALYSIS OF FINDINGS
3.6 ETHICS IN THE RESEARCH PROCESS
3.7 VALIDITY AND TRUSTWORTHINESS
3.8 A CONCLUDING COMMENT

CHAPTER 4
FINDINGS: A NEST OF VIGNETTES
4.1. INTRODUCTION
4.2 THE EE POLICY STORY OF BOTSWANA
4.2.1 Broad Policy Processes
4.2.1.1 Policy history
4.2.1.2 Approach
4.2.2 Broad Institutional Make-up
4.2.2.1 Structure
4.2.2.2 Economic Capital
4.2.3 Broad Policy Context
4.2.3.1 Relationship between Fields
4.2.3.2 Discourse
4.2.4 Broad Policy Actors and Power Relations
4.2.4.1 Actors and Knowledge
4.2.5 Use of seed funding
4.3 THE EE POLICY STORY OF MALAWI
4.3.1 Broad Policy Processes
4.3.1.1 Policy history
4.3.1.2 Approach
4.3.2 Broad Institutional Make-up
4.3.2.1 Structure
4.3.2.2 Economic Capital
4.3.3 Broad Policy Context
4.3.3.1 Relationship between Fields
4.3.3.2 Discourse
4.3.4 Broad Policy Actors and Power Relations
4.3.4.1 Actors and Knowledge
4.4 THE EE POLICY STORY OF NAMIBIA
4.4.1 Broad Policy Processes
4.4.1.1 Policy history
4.4.1.2 Approach
4.4.2 Broad Institutional Make-up
4.4.2.1 Structure
4.4.2.2 Economic Capital
4.4.3 Broad Policy Context
4.4.3.1 Relationship between Fields
4.4.3.2 Discourse
4.4.4 Broad Policy Actors and Power Relations
4.4.4.1 Actors and Knowledge
4.4.5 Use of seed funding
4.5 THE EE POLICY STORY OF SOUTH AFRICA
4.5.1 Broad Policy Processes
4.5.1.1 Policy history
4.5.1.2 Approach
4.5.2 Broad Institutional Make-up
4.5.2.1 Structure
4.5.2.2 Economic Capital
4.5.3 Broad Policy Context
4.5.3.1 Relationship between Fields
4.5.3.2 Discourse
4.5.4 Broad Policy Actors and Power Relations
4.5.4.1 Actors and Knowledge
4.5.5 Use of seed funding
4.6 THE EE POLICY STORY OF TANZANIA
4.6.1. Broad Policy Processes
4.6.1.1 Policy history
4.6.1.2 Approach
4.6.2 Broad Institutional Make-up
4.6.2.1 Structure
4.6.2.2 Economic Capital
4.6.3 Broad Policy Context
4.6.3.1 Relationship between Fields
4.6.3.2 Discourse
4.6.4 Broad Policy Actors and Power Relations
4.6.4.1 Actors and Knowledge
4.6.5 Use of seed funding
4.7 THE EE POLICY STORY OF ZIMBABWE
4.7.1 Broad Policy Processes
4.7.1.1 Policy history
4.7.1.2 Approach
4.7.2 Broad Institutional Make-up
4.7.2.1 Structure
4.7.2.2 Economic Capital
4.7.3 Broad Policy Context
4.7.3.1 Relationship between Fields
4.7.3.2 Discourse
4.7.4 Broad Policy Actors and Power Relations
4.7.4.1 Actors and Knowledge
4.7.5 Use of seed funding
4.8 A CONCLUDING COMMENT

CHAPTER 5
5.1 INTRODUCTION
5.2 ANALYTIC STATEMENT 1:
5.2.1. Assumptions about environmental education policy as a priority
5.2.2 Support mechanisms and spheres of influence
5.3 ANALYTIC STATEMENT 2:
5.3.1 Understanding the complexity of a fragmented policy environment
5.3.2 Understanding complexities of a dynamic policy content
5.3.3 Introducing policy changes is a huge resource commitment
5.4 ANALYTIC STATEMENT 3:
5.5 CONCLUDING COMMENTS

CHAPTER 6
RECOMMENDATIONS AND CONCLUSION
6.1 INTRODUCTION
6.2 SUMMARY OF STUDY
6.3 RECOMMENDATIONS
6.4 RECOMMENDATION FOR FURTHER RESEARCH
6.4.1 The issue of the actors and networks needs to be probed further
6.4.2 The SADC REEP′s open-ended approach to policy processes needs to be probed further
6.5 REFLECTIONS ON THE STUDY
6.6 CONCLUDING COMMENT

REFERENCE LIST

APPENDICES
APPENDIX 1: Samples of the Colour Coded Reports
APPENDIX 2: A Sample of the Systematic Summary of the Reports
APPENDIX 3: The Open-ended Questionnaire – the Malawi example
APPENDIX 4: The Open-ended Questionnaire – some examples of responses
Original-Quelle (URL):
Datum des Zugriffs:
13.11.1017