User Online: 4 | Timeout: 01:13Uhr ⟳ | Ihre Anmerkungen | Verein (VfÖ) | Info | Auswahl | Logout | AAA  Mobil →
BNELIT - Datenbank zu Bildung für nachhaltige Entwicklung: wissenschaftliche Literatur und Materialien
Bildung für nachhaltige Entwicklung: wiss. Literatur und Materialien (BNELIT)
Datensätze des Ergebnisses:
Suche: Auswahl zeigen
Treffer:1
Sortierungen
1. Aufsatz in Zeitschrift
(Korrektur)Anmerkung zu einem Objekt von BNE-LITERATUR per email Dieses Objekt in Ihre Merkliste aufnehmen (Cookies erlauben!) in den Download Korb (max. 50)!
Verfasser/-in:
 
Hauptsachtitel:
Reflective Practice: A Case Study of Professional Development for Environmental Education.
Zeitschrift/Zeitung:
The Journal of Environmental Education
Z-Jahrgang:
27
Z-Heftnummer/-bez.:
3
Erscheinungsjahr:
Seite (von-bis):
11-20
Kurzinfo:
Abstract: A case study is presented of a professional development program for environmental education in Australia that applies the principles of participatory research and critical reflection. These two principles are embodied in the concept of reflective practice. Reflective practice involves using ethical and contextual considerations in professional decisionmaking rather than making such decisions on the basis of habit, intuition, impulse, and tradition. The education of ?reflective practitioners? of this type is the goal of the Master of Environmental Education program at Griffith University in Queensland, Australia. After an introduction to the program and the concept of reflective practice, a case study of the experiences of students in one of the subjects of that program is presented. The case study revealed that students derived a number of benefits from developing their reflective practice skills, including heightened political awareness, a strong sense of influences and limitations of social context on their ideas and environmental education practices, increased self-confidence, and a desire to continue in a reflective practice group. The case study also revealed some of the concerns of the students and staff, especially in the areas of assessment, the fear of personal disclosure, and the need for structured peer support.
Original-Quelle (URL):
DOI:
10.1080/00958964.1996.9941462