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Hauptsachtitel:
Consumer tribes
Erscheinungsort:
Amsterdam
Erscheinungsjahr:
ISBN:
9780750680240
Titelbild:
Kleinbild
Kurzinfo:
Marketing and consumer research has traditionally conceptualized consumers as individuals- who exercise choice in the marketplace as individuals not as a class or a group. However an important new perspective is now emerging that rejects the individualistic view and focuses on the reality that human life is essentially social, and that who we are is an inherently social phenomenon. It is the tribus, the many little groups we belong to, that are fundamental to our experience of life. Tribal Marketing shows that it is not individual consumption of products that defines our lives but rather that this activity actually facilitates meaningful social relationships. The social ?links? (social relationships) are more important than the things (brands etc.) The aim of this book is therefore to offer a systematic overview of the area that has been defined as ?cultures of consumption?- consumption microcultures, brand cultures, brand tribes, and brand communities. It is though these that students of marketing and marketing practitioners can begin to genuinely understand the real drivers of consumer behaviour. It will be essential to everyone who needs to understand the new paradigm in consumer research, brand management and communications management.
Inhaltsverzeichnis :
Contents

List of contributors

Part I Conceptual Foundations

1 Tribes, Inc: the new world of tribalism

Bernard Cova, Robert V. Kozinets and Avi Shankar

Introduction

Consumer tribes are activators

Consumer tribes are double agents

Consumer tribes are plunderers

Consumer tribes are entrepreneurs

Conclusion: tribes are open, aporic, and incorporated References

2 Trabal aesthetic

Michael Maffesoli

References

3 Marketing the savage: appropriating tribal tropes

Robin Canniford and Avi Shankar

Introduction

The fall and rise of surf-culture

Hollywood beach films

Endless summars and cultural napalm

Appropriating tribal tropes

Refernces

Part II Tribes as activators

4 The consumption of cultural heritage among a British Royal family brand tribe

Cele C. Otnes and Pauline Maclaran

Methods

Findings

Discussion

References

5 The evolution of a subculture of consumption

John W. Schouten, Diane M. Martin and James H. McAlexander

Introduction

The orginal study in retrospective

Market forces and subculture change

A critical turn

Conclusion

Acknowledgements

References

6 Metro/Fashion/Tribes of men: negotiating the boundaries of mes`s legitimate consumption

Diego Rinallo

Introduction

Marketplace actors and the cultural production of fashionable masculinities

Method

When men look at other man: reading strategies of straight and gay consumers

the risky consumptionscape of straight man

The gaydar is dead: long live the gaydar!

Discussion and conclusion

Acknowledgements

References

7 The linking value of subcultural capital: constructing the Stockholm brat enclave

Jacob Ostberg

Theoretical positioning

Subcultural capital

Methodological procedures

Results: the reflexive construction of subcultural capitel

Concluding remarks

References

Part III Tribes as double Agents

Theoretical positioning

8 Sociality in motion: exploring logics of tribal consumption among cruisers

Dougles Brownlie, Paul Hewer and Steven Treanor

Introduction

Tribes in motion

A (sub)cultural approach to consumption

Tribal membership practices

Car practices

Methodology

The cruise: as a way of being togehter

Stylization and customization

Individualism and affiliation

Aloofness and fluid hierarchies

Discussion

References

9 Hunting for cool tribes

Clive Nancarrow and Pamela Nancarrow

Hunting for cool

Postmoderne tribes

Tribes and distinction

Subcultural or tribal capitel

So what is cool?

Defining cool

The commodification of cool and the cultural capital of consumption

Messengers of cool

Coolhunting

A case study: looking for cool

Conclusion

References

10 Temperance and religiosity in a non-marginal, non-stigmatized brand community

Hope Jensen Scahu and Albert M. Muñiz Jr

The way of the rockstar

Our approach

My life / your world: religiosity in the TPATH fan community

Concluding thoughts

References

11 Impringting, incubation and intensification: factors contributing to fan club formation and continuance

Paul Henry and Marylouise Caldwell

Introduction

Method

Findings

Conclusion

Refernces

Part IV Tribes as plunderers

12 Harry Potter and the Fandom Menace

Stephen Brown

This just in

Authorenship

Back Story

Real Story

The triwizard iTribes

Get a life

The auror, the auror

When good fans go bad

References

13 Inno-tribes: Star Trek as wikimedia

Robert V. Kozinets

A brief history of Star Trek

Star Trek as wikimedia

Prosuming`s final frontier

Gays, grays, and ego player

Death by canon, or the death of canon?

Star Trek fans as inno-tribes

Considerations

Refernces

14 Seeking community throught battle: understanding the meaning of consumption processes for warhammer gamers`
communities across borders

David J.Park, Sameer Deshpande, Bernard Cova and Stefano Pace

Introduction

Consumption tribes

Warhammer

Understanding gaming brand community: a case of warhammer gamers in the US and France

Warhammer community: in between postmodernism and poststructuralism

Conclusion

References

Part V Tribes as entrepreneurs

15 `Gothic` entrepreneurs: a study of the subcultural commodification process
Christina Goulding and Michael Saren

Introduction

The research background

The research methods

The stages of subcultural commodification

Some conclusions and implications

References

16 Marketing, prosumption and innovation in the fetish community
Roy Langer

Introduction

Defining the fetish brand community

Methodology

ManiFest: a fetish carnival

Marketing and innovation in the fetish tribe

Conclusion

Acknowledgements

References

17 The war of the eTribes: online conflicts and communal consumption
Kristine de Valck

Introduction

Netnographic study

Findings

Discussion

References

18 Brand communities and their social antagonists: insights from the Hummer case

Marius K. Luedicke and Markus Giesler

Analytical framework

The Hummer case

Empirical evidence

References

19 New consumption communities and the re-eanbling of 21st century consumers

Isabella Szmigin, Marylyn Carrigan and Caroline Bekin

The production consumption and production

Re-enabling the consumer

Conceptualizing new consumption communities

A closer look at the consumption circle

A conceptual framework for understanding new consumption communities

Conclusion

References

20 Internationalization of a craft enterprise through a virtual tribe:
`Le Nuvole` and the pipe-smoker tribe

Stefano Pace, Luciano Fratocchi and Fabrizio Cocciola

Introduction

Tribal marketing and virtual internationalization

The virtual tribe of pipe-smokers and `Le Nuvole` : a small workshop becomes international

Conclusions

References

Index
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